• Inner Banner Bg

SPCC Plans for Airports – Recent Lessons Learned on How to Account for Mobile Equipment and Above Ground Storage

In accordance with the Oil Pollution Prevention regulation (40 CFR Part 112), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requires certain facilities to prepare, amend, and implement Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans.  SPCC Plans are required if a facility stores greater than 1,320 gallons of oil in above-ground storage in containers equal to or greater than 55 gallons in capacity or has 42,000 gallons of completely buried oil storage capacity and has a “reasonable expectation of an oil discharge” to waterway or adjoining shoreline.

Continue reading

EEC Environmental Awarded General Environmental and Engineering Service Contract with Huntington Beach

EEC Environmental is excited to announced we will be continuing our strong professional relationship with the City of Huntington Beach, California. EEC recently awarded an on-call general environmental and engineering service contract with the City. While EEC has been supporting multiple projects for the City in recent years, including the development of the City’s first Navigation Center for the City’s homeless, this new contract will expand EEC roles. We are thrilled for this opportunity and are looking forward to our continued partnership. 

Continue reading

31st Annual Environment Virginia Symposium March 23-25, 2021

EEC Environmental is excited to announce that two of their PFAS experts have been selected to present at the prestigious 31st Annual Environment Virginia Symposium, March 23-25, 2021!

  • Mr. John Shaffer, CEO and Chemist, will present “PFAS Water Treatment Technologies: Pros and Cons of GAC and IX
  • Ms. Emily Vavricka, Project Scientist, will present “PFAS Hiding in Plain Sight: The Unexpected Sources of PFAS”

Continue reading

Issuance of Informal Staff Draft Statewide Sanitary Sewer Systems Order Reissuance

The State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) has issued a public notice announcing: (1) the availability of an informal staff draft Statewide Sanitary Sewer System WDR, and (2) two public workshops to provide stakeholders and interested parties information regarding the preliminary informal staff draft General Order. Stakeholders and interested parties are encouraged to provide oral feedback to staff during these workshops.

Continue reading

EPA Takes Action to Address PFAS in Drinking Water

WASHINGTON — Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued two actions to protect public health by addressing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in drinking water, highlighting the agency’s commitment to address these long-lasting “forever chemicals” that can enter drinking water supplies and impact communities across the United States. The Biden-Harris administration is committed to addressing PFAS in the nation’s drinking water and will build on these actions by advancing science and using the agency’s authorities to protect public health and the environment.

Continue reading

What Are PFAS and Why Are They an Issue?

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of approximately 5,000 anthropogenic fluorinated chemicals whose presence in the environment is becoming of significant interest both in the United States and abroad.  PFAS have been used since the 1940s in numerous industrial and residential products such as Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) for firefighting, metal plating, food packaging, specialty surfactants, non-stick cookware, water-resistant fabrics, and others.

Continue reading

environmental pollution

What Can the COVID-19 Virus Tell Us About Environmental Pollution?

The spread of the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, around the world wreaks havoc on economies and populations. However, with a reduction of human activity around the globe, one area that’s benefitting from the new normal is the environment.

With most of the world’s populations facing extended lockdowns and governments enforcing social-distancing guidelines, the natural environment is thriving. Social media posts about wildlife roaming around city centers show that our effect on the environment remains concerning.

Continue reading

Assessment of Stormwater Runoff, MS4

2018 Industrial Storm Water General Permit Amendment

The California statewide National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Storm Water General Permit regulates the discharge of water associated with industrial activity.  On November 6, 2018 the State Water Board amended the General Permit to new requirements. These additional requirements become effective on July 1, 2020.

Continue reading

Latest News: California Sets the Lowest Notification Levels for PFAS in the Country

The California State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water (DDW), has accepted the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment’s (OEHHA) recent recommendation on new lower Notification Levels (NLs) for PFOA and for PFOS. On August 23, 2019, the DDW announced it established notification levels for PFOS and PFOA at 6.5 parts per trillion for PFOS and 5.1 parts per trillion for PFOA. These new levels are set at the lowest levels at which they can be reliably detected in drinking water using currently available analytical detection methods.

More information can be found here.

Joseph Jenkins of EEC Presented for WEF on the Implementation of FOG Control Programs May 30

EEC presented in a webcast hosted by the Water Environment Federation (WEF).  EEC’s Joseph Jenkins shared his expertise about the proper implementation of plumbing code requirements to prevent blockage of fats, oils, and grease (FOG) that can be accumulated in sewer lines. The abstract for the presentation can be found here.

Continue reading

Industrial General Permitting

Most new construction, development and upgrade projects require some sort of industrial general permitting assessment.  Sometimes abbreviated as IGP, this permit puts regulations in place for how stormwater is discharged from industrial sites.

Continue reading

soil and groundwater

What Is Bioremediation?

What Does Bioremediation Technology Entail?

Bioremediation is the method of cleaning up groundwater, soil, and subsurface contaminations using biological organisms. Bioremediation specialists treat pollutants, such as oil, pesticides, solvents and various petroleum products, through mimicking and stimulating nature’s biodegradation processes.

Continue reading

Soil and Groundwater Remediation System Design

As available land for construction and redevelopment in large urban environments becomes more and more scarce, the once terrifying idea of redeveloping an environmentally impacted site has now become a tremendous opportunity to make a significant return on investment. As savvy investors realize these opportunities, soil and groundwater remediation is something many developers and investors face on a daily basis. The good news is that we have entered an era when there is an ever-expanding list of options to clean these sites at greatly reduced cost and time frames than in early years of environmental industry.

Continue reading

TSCA and the Pollution Prevention Act Compliance

Understanding an Environmental Site Assessment

ESA and the Pollution Prevention Act ComplianceAn ESA, short for Environmental Site Assessment, is an evaluation of a property for the purposes of identifying any existing or potential environmental issues. ESAs are ordered during the due diligence period of the sale of a property by lenders and purchasers to avoid contamination liabilities. ESAs are completed for commercial, industrial, and multi-family residential properties as well as undeveloped land. The Phase I ESA is also completed to support the “innocent landowner defense” pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The evaluation begins with a Phase I ESA and is followed by a Phase II ESA if necessary.

What Is a Phase I ESA?

The objective of the Phase I ESA is to assess the environmental condition of the property and identify recognized environmental conditions (RECs), as defined by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), in connection with the property.  The Phase I ESA comprises the following steps:

  • Site inspection for petroleum products, hazardous chemical storage areas, chemical spills, underground storage tanks, clarifiers, sumps, and pits, among other things
  • Review of federal, state and local governmental files
  • Review of historical sources including aerial photographs, topographic maps, city directories, fire insurance maps, recorded land title records, building department records, and environmental reports
  • Interviews with tenants, current and past owners, key site managers, neighbors and government officials
  • Review of public records of neighboring properties that are hazardous or contaminated as per federal and state regulations to evaluate contamination risk
  • Review of the physical setting of the property, including general geology, topography, and hydrogeology
  • A review of recorded land title records, regulatory agency records, and State Institutional Controls/Engineering Controls databases for environmental liens or activity and use limitations (AULs)
  • Review potential vapor encroachment conditions (VECs) at the property
  • Out-of-scope, optional considerations may include mold, lead, radon, asbestos, wetlands, flood zone, and seismic hazards

What Is a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment?

If RECs are identified during a Phase I ESA, a Phase II ESA may be requested. Phase II ESAs involve sampling of groundwater, soil, soil vapor, and indoor air to check for chemicals such as petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, metals, and other contaminants. The following tasks may be conducted during the second phase to verify the existence and concentrations of hazardous substances:

  • Surficial soil and water sampling
  • Subsurface soil, soil vapor, and groundwater sampling
  • Geophysical testing to identify buried drums and tanks
  • Sampling of indoor air to evaluate health risks to occupants
  • Installation of groundwater monitoring wells to evaluate groundwater beneath the site and neighboring properties

What Standards Should Be Followed for an Environmental Site Assessment?

Phase I ESAs must meet the most updated standards established by ASTM and the All Appropriate Inquiries Rule (AAI) under CERCLA. Phase II ESAs must comply with applicable USEPA, State, and local regulatory agency requirements. The assessments must be performed by environmental experts with professional registrations who are trained in the fields of geology, hydrogeology, environmental science, engineering, biology, and chemistry, among others.

EEC Environmental has over 20 years of experience providing consulting services to a variety of clients. If you are in search of an environmental site assessment company, need remediation help with a contaminated site or simply have questions regarding any of the assessment steps or services, contact us and one of our experts will assist you.