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Compliance

EEC Presented at the 22nd Annual CUPA Conference February 3-6, 2020

EEC presented at the 22nd Annual California Unified Program Annual Training Conference (CUPA) February 3-6, 2020 in Burlingame, California. EEC’s Emily Vavricka presented on the emerging contaminant PFAS, focusing on PFAS sampling procedures, analytical methods, and current regulatory updates.


The California CUPA Forum is a non-profit 501(c)(6) statewide association that works with the Office of the State Fire Marshal, the California Office of Emergency Services, the Department of Toxic Substances Control, the State Water Resources Control Board and Cal EPA to update and continuously improve the Unified Program for the agencies, businesses and the communities that are served. For the past 21 years, the California CUPA Forum Board has invited both government entities and industries to attend and receive the same training at the annual training conference.

EEC is a nationally recognized leader in the field of soil, soil vapor, and groundwater assessment, remediation, due diligence, and compliance through “Out of the Box” unique technical solutions blended with industry proven strategies.


For more information on the 22nd Annual California CUPA Training Conference, please click here.

EEC exhibited at the 28th Annual Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite, CA to Feature PFAS

EEC Environmental (EEC) exhibited at the 28th Annual Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite at the Tenaya Lodge at Yosemite, October 17-20, 2019.

The Environmental Law Conference at Yosemite® is nationally recognized as the largest and most prestigious gathering in California of leaders in environmental, land use, and natural resources law.

EEC featured our expertise in tackling Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) which pose a serious human health risk leading to stringent action levels in California and throughout the US. 

EEC provides a broad spectrum of litigation support ranging from scientific investigations to expert testimony in state and federal courts. EEC’s ability to provide a reliable scientific basis for overcoming or minimizing contentious issues includes experience in matters related to contamination of soil, soil vapor, and groundwater; geologic and hydrogeological issues; industrial wastewater; historical document research and PRP Identification; CERCLA cost allocation; and insurance cost recovery.

Click the following link at https://calawyers.org/section/environmental-law/yosemite/ for more information.

Industrial General Permitting

Most new construction, development and upgrade projects require some sort of industrial general permitting assessment.  Sometimes abbreviated as IGP, this permit puts regulations in place for how stormwater is discharged from industrial sites.

Facilities Subject to Regulations

Not all facilities are subject to regulations regarding stormwater discharge, or need an industrial general permit. However, some of the types of facilities that are usually subject to these regulations include:

  • Hazardous waste management
  • Landfills
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining
  • Recycling
  • Sewage or wastewater treatment
  • Transportation

This is by no means an exhaustive list. The IGP may differ as you move across state lines as some states prioritize natural resource management more than others. The facility’s Standard Industrial Code (SIC) determines if coverage is required.  If your facility has no outside exposure of the potential pollutants, then your facility can obtain non-exposure certification (NEC).

What Happens if Your Business or Project is Out of Compliance?

It is the responsibility of local government agencies to identify and report any facilities that are out of compliance. However, older establishments are more likely to be out of compliance than new organizations.  This is because many government agencies now check business license applications to see if you will need an industrial general permit, and will usually inform you at that time. If you are found out of compliance, you may be significantly fined or have the project put on “hold”.

How to Verify if Your Facility is in Compliance

The process of verifying your organization’s compliance status varies from state to state, or even across city and county lines. As a result, it is important to have professional consultants on your team, like the environment compliance experts at EEC Environmental.  We are experienced in all environmental compliance and permitting applications, and assist our clients in navigating complex industrial permitting laws.

Should we find that you are out of compliance, we will also assist you with getting your permit in place, whether it requires a new application or a renewal.  For more information on how we can assist you, contact our corporate office at (714) 667-2300 or send us a detailed message via the contact form on our website.  Industrial general permits can be daunting, let EEC Environmental help you navigate.

Wastewater Treatment Compliance

Wastewater Treatment Compliance and Meeting Regulatory Requirements

Wastewater Treatment ComplianceThe treatment of wastewater is essential to ensuring public health and clean water. The process involves converting the wastewater into an effluent, or an outflowing of water to a receiving body of water, which can be directly reused or returned to the water cycle with minimal impact on the environment. However, before treated wastewater can be discharged to the water cycle, it must comply with local, state, and federal regulations. So, how can wastewater treatment facilities and entities that produce wastewater remain compliant with these regulations?

Federal State and Local Regulations

The Clean Water Act (CWA) prohibits the discharging of pollutants from a point source into a water of the United States unless they have a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. The permit provides control for technology-based and water quality-based limits.

The national pretreatment program, a component of the NPDES program, is a cooperative effort of the federal, state, and local levels of environmental regulatory agencies that have been established to protect water quality. Local municipalities can then perform permitting, administrative, and enforcement tasks for discharges into the municipalities’ publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

Wastewater Treatment Compliance

EEC Environmental (EEC) conducts local limits evaluations, develops industrial pretreatment ordinances and enforcement response plans, and assists in industrial user permitting. EEC also designs and builds wastewater pretreatment systems and performs pretreatment system evaluations for flows up to 2.5 millions of gallons per day (MGD).

Our team has unique expertise in developing technically based local limits and ensuring that industrial users have reasonable discharge permits. EEC has also created and conducts an operator training program for industrial wastewater dischargers and assists industries in achieving compliance with their wastewater discharge requirements.

EEC has developed a strong national reputation for helping public agencies, private industries, and commercial businesses come into complete compliance with their environmental regulations. We have experience negotiating favorable permit conditions for our clients resulting in reasonable regulations and millions of dollars in savings.

OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Found Safety Violations (Infographic)

When it comes to compliance, you can learn a lot by reviewing the safety requirements that OSHA most frequently finds to be in violation. This enables you to review your own operations for similar compliance issues and implement corrective action before OSHA comes calling. View the Infographic below to learn more about OSHA’s top 10 most frequently found safety violations.

 Infographic created by EEC Environmental; Information was taken from OSHA.

1 – Fall Protection in Construction Work: Consider your work area. Are there locations from which someone could fall? What sort of protection is in place to prevent a fall? And is there equipment to stop a fall?

2 – Hazard Communication: You must ensure that the hazards of all chemicals are labeled correctly. The requirements must be consistent with the provisions of the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling Chemicals (GHS).

3 – Scaffolding in Construction Work: Inspect and check daily. Take no chances. Scaffolding must be inspected by the scaffolding contractor after erection, and before use. Don’t remove or allow removal of any parts. Leave this to the scaffolding contractor only.

4 – Respiratory Protection: If you use a respirator, you must be cleanly shaven. Facial hair limits the effectiveness of the face-to-facepiece seal. Fit testing is also required prior to respirator use.

5 – Lockout/Tagout: Lockout/tagout is more than just putting a lock on the main electrical disconnect to a machine or part of a machine. You should always follow the lockout/tagout plan and verify that each potential hazard has been “de-energized” before starting a job.

6 – Powered Industrial Trucks: Ensure that a daily lift truck inspection is completed for each lift truck, prior to use. Do not use a lift truck if the checklist shows that maintenance is required.

7 – Ladders in Construction Work: All ladders shall be maintained in a safe condition and inspected regularly, with the intervals between inspections being determined by use and exposure. Those which have developed defects shall be withdrawn from service for repair or destruction and tagged or marked as “Dangerous, Do Not Use.”

8 – Electrical Wiring, Components, Equipment: Is there any exposed wiring in your work area? Are there any open receptacles? Is all the equipment properly grounded?

9 – General Machine Guarding: It is important that everyone working with or around machinery understands that no guard shall be adjusted or removed. No machine should be started without guards in place. If you see that guards are missing or defective, report it to your supervisor immediately.

10 – Electrical General Requirements: It is a violation when employers use equipment in the workplace that has only been labeled and listed for home use. Never use an extension cord as a permanent connection. An extension cord must be put away at the end of each task.