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NPDES

Assessment of Stormwater Runoff, MS4

2018 Industrial Storm Water General Permit Amendment

The California statewide National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Storm Water General Permit regulates the discharge of water associated with industrial activity.  On November 6, 2018 the State Water Board amended the General Permit to new requirements. These additional requirements become effective on July 1, 2020.

The amendments include:

  • Sufficiently Sensitive Test Methods – requiring a site pollutant source assessment for applicable Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL)
  • TMDL Implementation – including requirements for facility operators to collect industrial storm water samples for pollutant analysis and assessed for compliance
  • Additional State options incentivizing on-site or regional storm water capture and use

EEC Environmental specializes in the analysis, evaluation, communication and remediation of storm water runoff. 

In light of these amendments, EEC is available for related services including:

  • Conducting a site pollutant source assessment for applicable TMDLs.
  • Reviewing previous sample results to determine if the current BMPs implemented are adequate for meeting the TMDLs
  • Recommending additional BMPs both general and advanced that can help to meet the TMDL
  • Assist in responding to any enforcement actions taken by the Regional Water Quality Control Board.

The complete Amendment Fact Sheet is available as a download here. 

Contact EEC Environmental for storm water site support.

Wastewater Treatment Compliance

Wastewater Treatment Compliance and Meeting Regulatory Requirements

Wastewater Treatment ComplianceThe treatment of wastewater is essential to ensuring public health and clean water. The process involves converting the wastewater into an effluent, or an outflowing of water to a receiving body of water, which can be directly reused or returned to the water cycle with minimal impact on the environment. However, before treated wastewater can be discharged to the water cycle, it must comply with local, state, and federal regulations. So, how can wastewater treatment facilities and entities that produce wastewater remain compliant with these regulations?

Federal State and Local Regulations

The Clean Water Act (CWA) prohibits the discharging of pollutants from a point source into a water of the United States unless they have a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. The permit provides control for technology-based and water quality-based limits.

The national pretreatment program, a component of the NPDES program, is a cooperative effort of the federal, state, and local levels of environmental regulatory agencies that have been established to protect water quality. Local municipalities can then perform permitting, administrative, and enforcement tasks for discharges into the municipalities’ publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

Wastewater Treatment Compliance

EEC Environmental (EEC) conducts local limits evaluations, develops industrial pretreatment ordinances and enforcement response plans, and assists in industrial user permitting. EEC also designs and builds wastewater pretreatment systems and performs pretreatment system evaluations for flows up to 2.5 millions of gallons per day (MGD).

Our team has unique expertise in developing technically based local limits and ensuring that industrial users have reasonable discharge permits. EEC has also created and conducts an operator training program for industrial wastewater dischargers and assists industries in achieving compliance with their wastewater discharge requirements.

EEC has developed a strong national reputation for helping public agencies, private industries, and commercial businesses come into complete compliance with their environmental regulations. We have experience negotiating favorable permit conditions for our clients resulting in reasonable regulations and millions of dollars in savings.

Regulatory Closure, Compliance & Negotiation for Litigation, EPA

EPA Compliance Requirements for Real Estate Construction and Property Development

Environmental and land use regulations can, frequently, become overwhelming. Understanding and complying with these regulations take away from time-sensitive projects, and unwanted fines ranging into the tens of millions of dollars for larger commercial or retail property can be more than daunting. So what are some of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance requirements for real estate construction and property development?

Clean Water Act (CWA) Permit Coverage
Regulatory Closure, Compliance & Negotiation for Litigation, EPA, Construction

If your real estate construction activity disturbs one or more acres of land, you may have to obtain Clean Water Act (CWA) permit coverage for discharge of stormwater runoff from your construction site. The EPA National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program or the state NPDES permitting authority issues general permits for stormwater. However, to obtain permit coverage, you will need to submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) or permit application to develop and implement a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) and provide a Notice of Termination (NOT), if required by your permitting authority.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

If your site or project generates or handles hazardous wastes, such as lead-based paint (LBP); fluorescent lamps that contain mercury; and construction/demolition (C&D) wastes, such as wood, roof material, insulation, plaster, or sheet rock, then you may have to check their allowed concentrations are in the regulations that implement the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

Assistance Meeting EPA Compliance

Industrial Wastewater – CERCLA Allocation ProjectThere are a number of other laws and regulations under the construction sector (NAICS 23) of the EPA. However, there’s help to meet the requirements. EEC Environmental (EEC) has assisted real estate and property developers throughout the United States on all aspects of environmental-related issues. Our professionals understand the nuances of this business sector, including the need for rapid response, quick turnaround, and discretion that must be maintained throughout the process. EEC’s services are utilized at the earliest stages of the real estate transaction and development process, often even before the due diligence phase, when we do a “Phase 0” to quickly determine if there will likely be significant environmental issues.

We have extensive experience in large portfolio and specialized due diligence necessary for property transactions, evaluation of costs associated with environmental liabilities, evaluation of fast-track remediation alternatives, evaluation of risk-based remedial strategies, and installation of preventive mitigation equipment such as those to prevent vapor intrusion. Further, EEC assists our clients in determining if the utility infrastructure (electrical, sewer, stormwater) and permitting abilities are sufficient for the intended property use, developing and implementing SWPPPs, and conducting facility audits.

Our construction personnel has diverse backgrounds, which include mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and structural concrete experience. All construction staff works under the direct supervision of a construction manager with more than 20 years of experience and are 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operations, and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) trained to work at contaminated sites.

Contact EEC for more information.

Stormwater Pollution Prevention

What Is Stormwater Management and Why Is It Important?

Stormwater Pollution PreventionStormwater management is the effort to reduce runoff of rainwater or melted snow into streets, lawns and other sites and the improvement of water quality, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

When stormwater is absorbed into the soil, it is filtered and ultimately replenishes aquifers or flows into streams and rivers. However, when heavy rainwater hits, ground saturated by water creates excess moisture that runs across the surface and into storm sewers and road ditches. This water often carries debris, chemicals, bacteria, eroded soil, and other pollutants, and carries them into streams, rivers, lakes, or wetlands.

So, how does stormwater management help?

In urban and developed areas, impervious surfaces such as pavement and roofs prevent precipitation from naturally soaking into the ground. Instead, water runs rapidly into storm drains, sewer systems and drainage ditches and can cause flooding, erosion, turbidity (or muddiness), storm and sanitary sewer system overflow, and infrastructure damage. However, stormwater design and “green infrastructure” capture and reuse stormwater to maintain or restore natural hydrologies.

Detaining stormwater and removing pollutants is the primary purpose of stormwater management. Pervious Surfaces that are porous and allow rainfall and snowmelt to soak into the soil, Gray infrastructure, such as culverts, gutters, storm sewers, conventional piped drainage, and Blue/Green infrastructure that protect, restore, or mimic the natural water cycle, all play a part in stormwater management.

How can you help?

Educating yourself on where rainwater and snowmelt flow on your property when it doesn’t get absorbed into the ground is a huge first step. Implementing best management practices to reduce runoff and to make sure that it is clean when it leaves your property is the next step.

Stormwater MS4 InspectionsOur staff at EEC Environmental (EEC) has been specializing in stormwater compliance for more than 20 years. EEC can aid anyone looking to improve stormwater management on their property with our experience in developing stormwater pollution prevention plans (SWPPPs), sharing best management practices (BMPs), assisting with design, municipal separate storm and sewer systems (MS4), conducting inspections, and helping clients with Level 1 & 2 ERAs compliance.

Our staff has assisted both MS4 programs and industrial facilities with compliance issues as part of these services. EEC develops Local Implementation Plans (LIPs) that include program management and the inventory, prioritization, and inspection of industrial, commercial, and municipal facilities.

EEC’s Stormwater/National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) group has developed and implemented municipal, industrial, commercial, and construction programs to achieve full compliance with federal, state, and local stormwater regulations.

Successful implementation and management of a stormwater program demand a clear understanding of the NPDES permit requirements and solid teamwork between staff and consultants/contractors. EEC stands poised to support any city or industrial facility with their stormwater compliance needs, having supported other cities and industrial facilities with the development and implementation of their stormwater/NPDES programs, as well as having developed multiple LIPs.

Please click here if you need assistance with stormwater concerns.